Enfield Poltergeist

One of the most famous and mysterious cases of strange haunting, the Enfield poltergeist story and photos shocked and inspired many.

Many who investigated the claims of poltergeist activity believed the sounds and movement of objects to be true paranormal phenomena. Some of them, though, had their doubts about the teen girls: Could they have been making up the story? And when examining photographs of the children supposedly floating or being tossed in the air, one has to wonder if they jumped for the camera to make the claims of ghost interference appear true.

Today, people still wonder what the truth behind the Enfield poltergeist might be - haunted hoax or supernatural story?

Examing the following Enfield poltergeist photographs and decide for yourself...

The following story was excerpted from The Spectral Times:
What can only be described as one of the most renowned haunting cases in all of paranormal history let alone Great Britain: the Enfield Poltergeist!

The activity began when single parent, Peggy Hodgson moved into the small townhouse with her four children in August 1977 and continued until September 1978, with an added outburst in August 1980. This was around the village of Brimsdown, in the borough of Enfield, England.

It's claimed during this time that furniture is said to have moved by itself, knockings on the walls were heard, and children's toys were said to have been thrown around and to have been too hot to touch when picked up.

It's still undetermined exactly what the cause of the activity was. Peggy's daughters Janet (11) and Margaret (12) were at the center of the commotion. Famous paranormal investigator Maurice Grosse photographed the two supposedly 'floating' or being thrown around the house by an unknown 'entity.' Janet eventually started to speak in a deep gruff voice and described herself as a man called 'Bill' who'd 'died in a chair downstairs.'

Eventually the case died down and no thorough conclusion has ever been made...

Although startling, Bill was later proven to have been a real person who did die of a brain hemorrhage downstairs in their house.

The case has inspired countless works of fiction, including the diety 'Gozer' which Dan Akroyd incorporated into the script of his cult classic 'Ghostbusters.'



Thanks to Great British Ghosts.